Creativity-based Research: The Process of Co-Designing with Users

Caroline Naranjo-Bock writes for UX magazine about the practice of co-design and the different stages – taking account of what the research goals and questions are; who the audience is and what tools they can use; the users invited to participate; running workshops with different methods; trying a pilot and analysing the results. These don’t have to be done in a face to face setting.

New forms of co-design have emerged that take advantage of digital technologies to allow hundreds of users to co-create a product or service regardless of their location. Most of these co-design efforts come in the form of contests or collaborative online platforms that encourage users to submit ideas directly to the company and to collaborate with their peers.

Open innovation and crowdsourcing initiatives are open calls to a broad community of people for help with the design of a company’s next product or service, or for ongoing ideas that might be considered for real production.

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Teach Up: Create a classroom that works for all students

Robert Ryshke looks at a model of teaching up which has seven principles

  1. Accept that human differences are not only normal but also desirable.
  2. Develop a growth mindset.
  3. Work to understand students’ culture, interests, needs and perspectives.
  4. Create a base of rigorous learning opportunities for ALL students.
  5. Understand that students come to the classroom with varied points of entry into a curriculum and move through it at different rates.
  6. Create flexible classroom routines and procedures that attend to learner needs.
  7. Be an analytical practitioner.

He looks at learning environments where students have been segregated and not given opportunities to share and outlines how these principles can be implemented

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Whether the digital era improves society is up to its users – that’s us

Danah Boyd writes in the Guardian Battle for the Internet series. She looks at the impact of fear and notes how it can be a mechanism of control, how people are responding to overwhelming information through their online connections, where psychological warfare is being used to try and capture and maintain people’s attention. She questions whether radical transparency is worthwhile and mentions how people are

How do these impact people’s online experience through their networks. She notes that people have access to more people through more networks with more visibility and wonders about the implications in terms of their relationships.

it’s high time we examined the values that are propagated through our tools. We all need to think critically about the information we create, consume and share

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Is blogging and tweeting about research papers worth it? The Verdict

Melissa Terras started a project in October 2011 to make all her articles available via an open access repository.

I decided that as well as putting them in the institutional repository, I would write a blog post about each research project, and tweet the papers for download. Would this affect how much my research was read, known, discussed, distributed?

Did it work? She writes an insightful post on the result.

The verdict

Peer-Based Learning in a Networked Age

Mimi Ito’s keynote in 2010 is highly relevant to the numerous conversations that are springing up around educational change. Are we in a networked age? Mimi notes that traditional boundaries of educational institutions are changing with the impact of new networked media where peer based learning occurs beyond the classroom.

Unlike their relationship to mainstream media, unlike their relationship with content and activities that adults provision for them, these smaller scale peer publics are ones that they participate in not just as consumers but as producers and distributors of content, knowledge, taste and culture. They make decisions about how to craft their profiles, what messages to write, and what kind of music, video, and artwork they want to post, link to and forward. And these choices about what media to display and circulate are conducted in a public space visible to their peers that have direct consequences to their reputation in the social circles that matter to them the most.

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Final Thoughts – the impact of technology on education

Ms Gray recently completed a course on using technologies in education and shares her thoughts on using in a higher school maths classroom. She reflects on her experiences of using blogs, wikis, podcasts for the first time. She looks at how perspectives are changing from teacher centered to learner centered.

I have a vision for where I want to take my classroom technologically. I want to not just accomplish a task differently, but accomplish a completely different task. One goal that I have is to have an up and running blog site maintained and monitored by students (and me of course) that will be a tool for students to communicate with each other and myself. Students will be able to get homework help and even post problems to discuss. In addition to discussions and homework help, students will use the blog to reflect on their own learning and the mathematics specifically. The second goal would be for students to move away from poster boards and PowerPoint and use wikis and podcasts to complete projects. Students would use the wiki space to collaborate about the project and I would monitor each members contributions and offer assistance when needed. After using the wiki to collaborate, students will produce their final product as a podcast.

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Changing Learners, Changing Methodologies

Danielle McCartan posts from New Jersey and notes that American schools are falling behind worldwide because “teachers are becoming archaic”, with students’ use of smartphones, apps and websites reflecting their learning choices. She explains how she is going to use Edmodo with her language students, encouraging students to create their own networks and videos, sharing resources.

Though I am not too far removed from high school, students today are very different than they were even six years ago, when I was a senior.  High school students are glued to their cell phones, they video chat with each other when they go home from school, they watch television while using their laptops and their smart phones, and they can chop up, edit, and produce a video in under an hour. I fit in this category: “today’s average college grads have spent less than 5,000 hours of their lives reading, but over 10,000 hours playing video games (not to mention 20,000 hours watching TV” (Prensky 1).  When questions in casual conversation arise, they can easily be answered in about 3 seconds – the time it takes to perform a search on Wikipedia on a smart phone.

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#change11 Getting to know you: introducing Jaap Bosman

Contributed by Liz Renshaw

Photo of Jaap smiling I would like to introduce you to Jaap Bosman. Jaap lives in the North West of the Netherlands in a polder built in 1930. 😉

It is 4 metres below sea level. At university Jaap studied Pedagogy and majored in the Philosophy of Science. He has been teacher, trainer and a book publisher.

Jaap is now the editor an educational site called Kennisnet at http://about.kennisnet.nl . Kennisnet is the public educational organisational that supports and inspires Dutch primary, secondary and vocational institutions in the effective use of ICT. Jaap’s speciality is soft skills: http://softskills.kennisnet.nl/

Jaap says that as an editor

I am always looking for inspiration and information and that is why I am in the MOOC

Jaap finds abundance of information is not a bad thing. He sees it as a blessing and chooses and selects the resources he needs for his job.

Jaap believes that building a network or PLE means that you must be trustworthy and send messages of value. Also he likes to ask questions. He sees it as being human and recognises the importance of answering questions, responding and adding personal messages.

He finds that most of his friends and people he connects to are using Twitter and Facebook so as an editor he uses these tools to communicate.

In the Change Mooc  he found that some presenters did excite him but he was really happy with his fellow students. Jaap’s post on this topic can be found at [http://connectiv.wordpress.com/2012/02/02/change11-teacher-roles-and-mooc/.

If you follow Jaap’s blog you will see that he always uses pictures.  His pictures are always intriguing and leave readers pondering their meaning and connection to the writing.

He believes that pictures are important. Words can tell a story, but pictures [http://jjbs.wordpress.com/] will tell so much more. Jaap’s minor at university was was “Images and words” a combination course of literature, arts and history of arts.

I would like to thank Jaap for agreeing to provide a profile for our Blog Calendar.

Can Online Learning Reproduce the Full College Experience?

In a paper for The Heritage Foundation, Karen McKeown compares online education with traditional college education. She looks at different reasons why students choose higher education and which institution, noting that whilst a large percentage of college graduates think it was a worthwhile investment, a large percentage of the public think it is unaffordable.

She looks at the educational, social and extracurricular components of online education, noting that there is an increase in studies which are providing evidence of effectiveness:

There will always be students who are pursuing a higher degree solely or primarily to achieve specific career goals and who have comparatively little interest in achieving a full college experience. Many of these students are older or already working and have been early adopters of online education, which has offered them the flexibility they need in achieving their ultimate goals.

At the other end of the spectrum will always be students who, for various reasons, want only the traditional on-campus college experience. For some of these students, the campus appeal may consist in the opportunities to interact in person with professors and classmates. Others may be pursuing majors, such as science or performing arts, that are less easily adapted to the online environment. Still others may be seeking aspects of the traditional social or extracurricular experience that they do not believe can ever be replicated or replaced by online education.

Between these two ends of the spectrum are students who are increasingly willing to consider online education as it gains wider visibility, acceptance, and sophistication and as traditional institutions of higher learning become less accessible financially.[49] For these students, a key factor in their choice will be the ability of online programs to provide a college experience that not only matches the academic content of a traditional college, but also includes an adequate level of the social and extracurricular components that the students desire.

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Providence Day tries tech-savvy teaching

(The Charlotte Observer – McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX) at Fixed Mobile Convergence

This article looks at a flipped classroom at Providence Day School where students and staff are experimenting with a range of devices and media

Teachers there started seeing tweets about the flipped-classroom approach pioneered by Colorado teachers Jon Bergmann and Aaron Sams. Matt Scully, the school’s technology director, got Bergmann and Sams to speak to faculty over the summer, and this school year a few Providence Day middle and high school classes flipped.

Psychology teacher Joe Grabenstetter likes the technique because he was so busy trying to cram in the required college-level material for his Advanced Placement class that he couldn’t squeeze in the kind of activities that bring the material to life.

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