Thank you

The complete list of links to articles and blogs on the calendar.

PDF copy of One Change A Day throughout the year.

WordPress annual report – One Change A Day statistics

Thank you reading this blog, also for all the comments and likes throughout 2012:

Coach Carole, Colonialist , Juandomingofarnos , VanessaVaile, George Veletsianos, Tom Hogers, Weiterbildungsblog, plerudulier, R Lewis Cordell, Amber Thomas, Leslie Poston, AnitaAnswers, Josh, John Mak, BrainySmurf, Liz Renshaw, Jaapsoft, JuergenAlbers, Glory Bea, Jonas Backelin, Josh Chalmers, Jeff Everhart, Teresa Penedo, Jonas Backelin, Jaap Bosman Transmediacamp101, Barnical, Brandon’s Educational blog, Inkblot, 2voices1song, Nellie Deutsch, Nina, Ted Curran, Dr Justin Staub, Jaraad, Henry Tapper, Jackie Regales, WikiQuals, Teochenghang, KenThinksAloud, ScottKotarides, Teahorvatic, CoolTeacherPodcast, JGousseva, Kerry Muste, iGameMom, MauriceABarry, Zac Egs, IdoLanuel, gpicone, Cristian Mihai, gluttrell, abacch03, elketeaches, SydneyFong, bottledworder, kateshrewsday, Simple Politiks, Jan Simson, Lesleycarter, poetrycurator, Jonathan Martin, oneanna65, Pak Liam, Odilets, Teachers Reflect, Keelan Foley, agencynews, starscraper99, tearmatt, clotildajamcracker, moderndaychris, Mazhar, Karen, Creative Donkey, Ashley Jillian, Ana Cristina Pratas, dloitz, MaggieMae, SimplePleasures, Manjree, Serena Turri, audedu, lejam jackson, 7th Heaven, Tuesday2, Nanxiliu, allaboutlemon, Moment Matters, Jeff Nguyen, A Ventography!, thatwritinglady, life of transition, Justin, Sebastian Raschka, Ankur Sharma, Stereotopical, MustardSeedBudget, Karris72

Retweets and mentions:

EugeneNizeyimana, Stefan Popenici, Dean Jenkins, Guven Cagdas, Sheila Stewart, Alvaro Anguix, Inland 2005, Donna Fry, Rita Silimbani, Linn Gustavsson, Allan Quartly, Liz Renshaw,, Marcia Forbes, Jane Mitchinson, Judy Baker, HalHol, Robin Yearsley, Francesca Beltrami, Maria Joao, Vladimir Kukharenko, Elizabeth Heck, Riitta, Suominen, myweb2learn, Virginia Pavlovich, Heli Nurmi, Frances BellVolkmar Langer, Brian S McGowan, Roberta Ranzani, Jenny Ankenbauer, Ora Baumgarten, Whitney Kilgore, 3ksan, Claire Thompson, Rahajeng Tunjung MD, Louise Lee,

And finally some of the search terms that people used to find the blog:

  • strategies of curiosity
  • milk characteristics
  • swan wiki
  • painting girl with ball
  • wings lacrosse team picture
  • painting learners
  • stone with blond hair
  • successful hair solutions
  • child connectivism with animals
  • I sit for 10 hours a day sewing

#Oped12 The Future of Higher Education and the MOOCs

With thanks to  John Mak for this post:

This talk by Michele Pistone discusses the future of higher education, which has been based on the same educational model for more than 100 years.

But the status quo is about to be disrupted, by the Internet and those educators — including new competitors — who would unleash its potential. Higher education institutions at a whole have not adequately recognized the threat to the status quo, or come close to responding adequately to it. In truth, responding adequately will be very difficult, because higher ed face a classic innovator’s dilemma. (TED video description)

There are many questions that relate to the future of higher education:

1. What would be the future role of Higher Education Institutions and Universities in the global and local communities?

2. What would they do, in times of rapid changes in society and a quest for more responsive to the needs and expectations of the society, government, learners and educators?

3. How would they do it differently?

One of the significant responses to these questions is the MOOC movement, with the introduction of x MOOCs by some of the prestigious Higher Education Institutions and Universities.

Here in an overview of MOOC, a typical MOOC likes Coursera is run based on the following design and delivery

With Coursera, the faculty member developing a course can either record lectures as presented to a class of students, or can make the recording in a studio or other location. The professor can then supplement the video with assessments—like quizzes—that can be automatically graded using Coursera software. The courses also include mastery-building interactive assignments and collaborative online forums. Time commitment varies; courses can range from a few weeks to over two months.

Ray Schroeder elaborates in this post on “how did we get here in the first place” – with MOOC, and what will happen next.  Ray explains that maturing of the internet, the recession that happened a few years ago and the rate of increase in college tuition and fees in recent years have led to the development and demand of such xMOOCs.

He further concludes: “These announcements point to the potential for a radically different higher education marketplace, disrupted by MOOCs. Classes with massive enrollment from a relatively small group of providers may dominate the market for many courses, and perhaps even degree programs. Colleges and universities may become brokers of credentials gathered from many sources, in many formats.”  I think this would soon have a multiplier effect, where more institutions would establish their own MOOCs or join the current MOOCs partnership, in order to be the leaders in this MOOC movement.

In this Schaffhauser, Dian. “Education Leaders See MOOCs, Distance Learning as the Future of Higher Ed.” Campus Technology 20 Aug. 2012. Web.

“The overall findings of the survey stated in the form of an equation might be: Today’s tough economy + market dynamics + technological advances = a higher education environment by 2020 in which 1) most people will get at least some of their education in massive open online courses; 2) a fairly large percentage will get all of their education in MOOCs; and 3) only a select few are likely to be able to afford to experience a fully campus-based, face-to-face education,” said principal author Janna Quitney Anderson, director of Imagining the Internet and associate professor in Elon’s School of Communications

I have been wondering how these MOOCs would evolve.  It seems that the current trend of more and more higher education institutions joining in the x MOOCs would likely exhibit the patterns as shown in the figure below, where such disruptive innovations (MOOCs) would soon out-perform the higher education institutions in a number of respects, especially in terms of the number of registrations of the students to MOOCs on a global basis, the attraction of global learners to those higher education institutions, and the branding in an international market, in the adoption of innovations in education and online education.

However, there may be challenges to such xMOOCs when it comes to the quality accreditation (such as those plagiarism and identity problems), and the sustainability of the business models (i.e. how it would be  financed in the long run).  There are also numerous critics on the pedagogy employed in xMOOCs, where concerns are made on the push education model where knowledge is pre-packaged and broadcasted, basically on a knowledge transfer model from the professor to the learners, with machine grading for the assessment.  It seems that there are little ACTUAL interaction between participants and the professor throughout the course, especially when the course participants amounted to tens of thousands.  See my previous post on the merits and demerits of the MOOCs.

In this connection, it may be important to speculate the future of MOOCs using the Product Life Cycle concept.  There are lots of assumptions behind this Product Life Cycle, and that we need more information in order to complete the Cycle.

First, what would be the Product Life Cycle like?

I reckon the current x MOOCs are at the stage of growth, though the business models are still emerging, see this post and this post on the possible models.

Institutions and MOOCs providers would likely refine their MOOCs as more experiences are gained, based on the feedback of the professors and learners, and the findings from the researches.  Also, there would be more intense competition among the different MOOCs providers in showcasing their brands, together with the “travelling” free study groups and free webinars and conferences to further attract new institutions on board and new learners to participate in the courses.  This might take two to three years for the growth to fully develop.

I would speculate that after 2 years of growth, in around 2014, the MOOCs would mature into global platforms where there would be different categories, with x MOOCs, c MOOCs and hybrid c & x MOOCs etc. all building their reputation in a global market.

What would happen next?  What do you think?

Photo credit: this post.


Professor Yashwant RAMMA in Le Mauricien writes about the changes and how they might impact students in Mauritius, noting that the majority of ICT use in schools has been mostly PowerPoint. He looks at contextual knowledge, pedagogy and technology – noting that concepts across different areas of knowledge are not connected in teaching areas.

Technology can serve the purpose of helping learners make sense out of nonsense (all the stuff they have to study). We should not forget that a classroom is composed of learners of different abilities, normally categorized in three groups: low, average and high abilities. This means that a teacher can expect that learning will occur if only he/she engages learners…

There is also a fascinating discussion in the comments questioning the impact of technologies in learning in other parts of the world and what is the value.

In full


Developing Alternative Research Assignments with Students and Faculty

Kathleen DeLaurenti looks at different options available through technology which can change how writing assignments are completed. She refers to a Music of the Civil War class where they completed alternative research assignments. There wasn’t a central learning portal so they developed an online bibliography where students could collect links and get feedback and also used a wiki to support the writing.

For the Civil War assignment, I focused on helping the students get started using the technology, but also on how to evaluate websites. Website evaluation was a significant part of the Worlds of Music project as well, but I also played a greater role in meeting with the students. Each group was required to sign up for a 45 minute meeting with me to make sure they were comfortable with the technology, but also to talk about the research resources and strategies they would need for the assignment. In addition to introducing them to key resources in ethnomusicology, we talked about how to narrow their topics (one wiki page in one semester certainly wouldn’t represent all of the music of China!) and how to present this material in the context of a wiki. For example, using slideshows if they built image collections rather than cluttering up their webpage with so many images it was confusing to other readers.

In full


Part one – 12 resources to discover and curate digital curriculum for teachers and students

Michael Gorman briefly looks back at using textbooks where he started his teaching career 35 years ago and what has since changed.

I first started my teaching career close to 35 years ago the textbook was not only the curriculum, it was also the center of learning. I was able to curate by finding an occasional article, ordering a 16 mm film several weeks in advance, finding a filmstrip with its exciting beeps between slides, and an occasional field trip.

He reviews a number of tools starting with Symbaloo and Diigo


The list in full


Why is research vital to e-learning?

akbacademic from the University of Derby technology blog in the UK  list a series of questions which will help reflect on why research is important and how it contributes to development. The list includes

  1. What’s the connection between innovation and dinosaurs?

  2. What links Kodak, Raleigh Bicycles and the Roman Empire?

  3. When is it time for you to retire?


In full


Fun is just a click away

Thabo Mohlala reports on the rise of use and appreciation of positive aspects of combining teaching with technology in South African classrooms. They mention the changes with lessons no longer being predictable but where the pupils have more choice and motivation about their activities. A competion was held for a number of pupil projects including:

One was by Sume Delport, who is artistic and whose goal was to make a painting for her room. The other one was by Michaela Zealand, a bookworm who wanted to finish a 170-page book in English, which is her first additional language. Delport did not know how to mix specific colours and had to do a Google search for a colour chart. In the process she learnt which colours complement one another. When she read the book, Zealand encountered some difficult words and had to use the cellphone-based dictionary to figure them out. “Both these pupils used mind maps to brainstorm and organise their thinking and knowledge-building.


In full


Software Evaluation

Sarah Cirella shares a screencast that she recently created reviewing software games for children. There are different characters to help, objects to click, missing words to find and a series of challenges. They discussed who the game might be appropriate for – what would be important at different ages

this game requires children to be able to use a mouse or track pad and to be able to understand the story and the concept of how the game is actually played. The only thing is if the child playing is between the ages of 6-8 we would recommend that an adult play with them, as some parts can be difficult (I played with my 6-year-old niece and she needed help, despite her stating otherwise).

She mentions the things they enjoyed, the good and not so good aspects including use of language

In full